Hydrogeo group

Capitalizing on Innovation, Technology, and the Evolution of Knowledge

Upcoming HGG Presentations

NWRA 2013 Mine Water Management Symposium

Speaker

Alan Mayo

Location

Peppermill Resort Spa & Casino, Reno, Nevada

Date

January 29, 2013

Session

NWRA 2013 Mine Water Management Symposium

Time

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Title

Mine Site Geochemical Characterization

Abstract

The full potential of major ion solute and isotopic chemistry in helping to resolve mine related groundwater issues is seldom realized. In most instances water quality analysis is limited to simple graphical presentations of major ion chemistry. Although useful, such representations only scratch the surface of the power of geochemical analysis. Examples of tools and methods for analyzing and presenting both solute and isotopic data for resolving issues such as pond and leach pad leakage, aquifer differentiation, groundwater compartmentalization, groundwater flow paths, cross-aquifer contamination, differentiating modern and paleo-groundwater, evaluating the impact of mining activities on springs and surface water sources, and tracing the sources and flow paths of groundwater contamination are presented. Topics include geochemical modeling codes, evaluation of geochemical evolution as a guide to flow path analysis, the use of the stable isotopes d2H and d18O, inorganic d13C, d34S, and d15N, and groundwater dating using, CFC’s tritium, and carbon-14. Examples of the application of these various tools are presented.

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NWRA 2013 Mine Water Management Symposium

Speaker

Michelle Smilowitz

Location

Peppermill Resort Spa & Casino, Reno, Nevada

Date

January 28, 2013

Session

NWRA 2013 Mine Water Management Symposium

Time

3:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Title

Case Studies and Developments in Groundwater Modeling

Abstract

Innovations in technology have transformed the way we apply finite difference modeling for mine planning by offering state-of-the-art tools that enhance our ability to visualize, analyze, and manage multifaceted data under one umbrella. These innovations integrate the sophistication of geographic information systems, the online collaboration of resources, cloud computing, stochastic modeling, and advancements in geoprocessing tools and modeling platforms. Collectively, these innovations define the next generation of finite difference modeling for mine planning. Successful mine planning integrates all areas of expertise, incorporating the knowledge- base and hands-on experience of geochemists, geologist, engineers, and hydrogeologists to properly characterize the systems that are being impacted from mining operations. Numerical models are used to help process the information and provide defensible and reproducible analyses to assist with various levels of mine planning, including water quality issues related to pit lakes and tailing ponds, potential contamination of underlying aquifers or nearby streams as a result of sedimentation of the riverbeds or chemicals leaching from exposed rocks. Models are also used to assist in understanding the types of mitigation measures that are feasible to ensure adequate protection of natural resources or to evaluate water supply options. Ironically, although models are built using the cooperative effort of all technical experts, the tools that are used to support this collaboration are often disconnected. The purpose of this presentation is to educate managers, regulators, and mine operators on the enhancements in technology that have changed the way finite difference models can be applied for mine planning.

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News and Emerging Issues

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Inglewood Oil Field fracking study finds no harm from the method

Ruben Vives, October 10, 2012

Yearlong study, conducted by firms chosen by the oil field owner and L.A. County, was meant to address fears about potential groundwater contamination, air pollution and increased seismic activity. A long-awaited study released Wednesday says the controversial oil extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, would not harm the environment if used at the Inglewood Oil Field in the Baldwin Hills area. The yearlong study included several issues raised by residents living around the field, such as the potential risks for groundwater contamination, air pollution and increased seismic activity.

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Well owners have duty to protect aquifer, NWRA says

Mark Waite, October 5, 2012

Jay Dixon, president of the Nevada Water Resources Association, decided it was time to do more outreach after a past president showed up at a Washoe County home asking when the last time the property owner had her well tested, and found the woman living there didn’t even know she had a well. That doesn’t seem to be a problem in Pahrump, where almost 70 people showed up for a well owners’ workshop at the Bob Ruud Community Center Monday night. "One of the nice things about coming to Pahrump is you guys are passionate about water," Dixon said.

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Well owners’ workshop scheduled Monday

Mark Waite, September 28, 2012

A domestic well owners’ information workshop is scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at the Bob Ruud Community Center. The free presentation will give information on the local water supply, including issues like the construction and depth of wells, the static and pumping levels, as well as flow rates. That will be preceded by a presentation on the community source water protection plan for public drinking water systems in Nye County at 5:15 p.m. Monday. The draft plan will be presented, maps showing the inventory of contaminant sources and an overview how the plan will be implemented in the future.

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Groundwater Pumping Plan Now In Hands Of State Engineer As Marathon Hearing Concludes

Sean Whaley, November 18, 2011

CARSON CITY – The fate of an ambitious plan by the Southern Nevada Water Authority to pump more than 125,00-acre feet of groundwater from rural areas of the state to slake the thirst of Las Vegas residents is now in the hands of the state engineer after a marathon hearing that began Sept. 26. State Engineer Jason King heard closing arguments today in the application process, with attorneys representing opponents of the project asking him to deny the water rights sought by the agency. Attorneys for Utah ranchers, Native American tribes, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and rural Nevadans argued that granting the applications would harm the environment and destroy their way of life.

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Aquifer storage and recovery: Need for critical analysis of the technical, economic, and regulatory issues

December 31, 1969

Competition for water will increase in the twenty-first century as we strive to meet the demands resulting from continued population and economic growth, and from efforts to protect and enhance aquatic ecosystems. Anticipated changes in the hydrologic cycle and hydrologic variability caused by global climate changes, the public's growing disaffection with dams, and the fact that virtually all surface waters are fully allocated, strongly suggests that groundwater will be an increasingly important component of water supplies in the future. The fact that groundwater, accounts for two-thirds of the freshwater resources of the world, and that its long residence time serves to protect it from short-term contamination problems, should instill confidence that it will be available to meet future agricultural, domestic, and industrial needs.

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Top 10 business risks to mining in 2012

Dawn Lovett, December 14, 2011

Ernst & Young’s global mining & metal division recently published a report stating the top business risks to mining in the coming year. These risks are very important for investors to consider, as higher valued stocks tend to have more risks involved. The case study was originally published by Madison Avenue Research and can be found here. 1. Resource nationalism – The mining and metals sector rebounded quickly from the economic downturn, and thus became a key player in restoring national treasury conditions. Since then, many producer nations have made plans to tax mining more heavily due to concerns over two-speed economies.

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DEBATE ON ENERGY ACCESS TAKES OFF IN THE CORRIDORS OF COP17

Aleksandra Tomczak, European Specialist, December 9, 2011

As we approach the last hours of this year’s climate change negotiations, informal bilateral and multilateral meetings multiply until early morning hours.At the same time many interesting side events are taking place and provide a good forum for the WCA to engage with the UN, the World Bank and businesses on issues such as energy access and the expected role of coal, along with other fuels and technologies, in providing alleviating energy poverty. Yesterday, the UN Foundation organised a session on "Cleaner and more affordable energy access". It brought together representatives from the Norwegian Government and the Global Network for Energy and Sustainable Development, as well as academics from universities in Zambia and Ghana.

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Marcellus Shale Coalition President: Fracking 'safe, responsible'

December 3, 2011

The recent editorial “Fracking in N.J. should be determined by science, not money” (Nov. 27), perhaps by design, fails to acknowledge key facts regarding the safe, responsible and tightly regulated development of job-creating American natural gas. Hydraulic fracturing is a key oil and natural gas production technology that's been in commercial use for more than 60 years in the United States. Our industry, made up of highly trained technical experts, understands the safe and regulated nature of this technology, as do common-sense environmentalists. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, who served as New Jersey's Environmental Protection commissioner under Gov. Jon Corzine, told Congress earlier this year:

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SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING FOCUSES ON ENSURING REGULATORY APPROACHES TO HYDRAULIC FRACTURING THAT WILL HELP PROTECT U.S. JOBS

November 16, 2011

Washington, DC – The Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment, chaired by U.S. Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-OH), held a hearing this morning to explore potential new regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the hydraulic fracturing of shale beds.EPA has found that natural gas production from shale formations has grown as a result of advances in drilling technologies and greater use of the technique of hydraulic fracturing. It has developed from a negligible amount just a few years ago to almost 15% of total U.S. natural gas production and is expected to triple in the coming decades. The newly extractable shale gas resources have changed the U.S. natural gas position from net importer to potentially a net exporter.

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Upcoming Events

2013 Mine Water Management Symposium

Reno, Nevada January 28-29, 2013

2013 Nevada Water Resources Association Annual Conference

Reno, Nevada January 28-29, 2013

Well Design, Construction & Rehab Workshop

Reno, Nevada January 28, 2013

American Business Conferences Global Mining Water Management 2013

Las Vegas, Nevada Jan 30-31, 2013

Global Mining Water Management Initiative 2013

Las Vegas, USA January 30, 2013 - January 31, 2013

The 2013 National & International Conference on Groundwater NGWA Summit

San Antonio, USA April 28, 2013 - May 02, 2013

ESRI 2013 International User’s Conference

San Diego, California July 8–12, 2013